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Why does team diversity matter?

To celebrate the launch of NHS England's new guide on how to create diverse boards (which we were privileged to author) we’re publishing a series of posts on how to make diversity part of the fabric of your organisation. All these posts are modified versions of what’s in the guide, so if you want more info make sure you download it (it’s free!). First up – why is any of this important at all? Because the people we work with are generally polite they don’t literally roll their eyes and groan when we talk about the importance of equality. But a lot of them come close. And why not? We’ve spent years setting out the different benefits of equality: the business case, the regulatory case, the mora

How do women respond to sexism in faith spaces?

Over the last couple of weeks, we've been looking at gender inequality in faith spaces. In this post, we look at four strategies women adopt in the face of this sexism: fight, move, accept, disengage. In collaboration with Near Neighbours, we recently spoke to 30 or so women in Birmingham to ask them about their experiences of being a woman in a religious space. You can find out more about who we spoke to and how in the full report, which is available here. In this series of posts, we’re exploring women’s responses in relation to four key questions. The first question was: are religions inherently sexist? The second question was: what’s it like being a woman in a faith space? The third quest

Why are faith leaders still mainly men?

In collaboration with Near Neighbours, we recently spoke to 30 or so women in Birmingham to ask them about their experiences of being a woman in a religious space. You can find out more about who we spoke to and how in the full report, which is available here. In this series of posts, we’re exploring women’s responses in relation to four key questions. The first question was: are religions inherently sexist? The second question was: what’s it like being a woman in a faith space? The third question, and subject of this post, is: why are faith leaders still mainly men? Most participants came from religions where women have a right to access leadership positions within the faith's institutions.

What's it like being a woman of faith?

"The traditional space now, it's too masculine. The people who have been in before and used the robes are men and I really feel that. Having to try to hold onto my identity as a women makes me realise that I've stepped into a masculine space." In collaboration with Near Neighbours, we recently spoke to 30 or so women in Birmingham to ask them about their experiences of being a woman in a religious space. You can find out more about who we spoke to and how in the full report, which is available here. In this series of posts, we’re exploring women’s responses in relation to four key questions. The first question was: are religions inherently sexist? The second question, and subject of this pos

Are religions inherently sexist?

In collaboration with Near Neighbours, we recently spoke to 30 or so women in Birmingham to ask them about their experiences of being a woman in a religious space. You can find out more about who we spoke to and how in the full report, which is available here. We asked a range of questions. In this post, we want to focus on responses which answer one specific question: are religions inherently sexist? Participants in our focus groups were unanimous in saying that their faiths were not inherently sexist. To explain the sexism and misogyny they had faced, some participants made a distinction between their religious texts and traditional interpretations and translations of them: I'm not sure th

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